My Walloon Ancestor of Norwich

I'm going back a bit with this one.  I've written about the Norwich Strangers before (known elsewhere as the Elizabethan Strangers).  Well I may have traced one on my family tree.  On my paternal grandfather's side, back on his maternal line a bit, to a 9th great grandfather:

The Strangers were invited to Norwich during the 16th and 17th centuries.  Protestant refugees from what is now the Netherlands and Belgium.  They were fleeing persecution from the Roman Catholic Spanish Crown.  They were invited to Norwich, and to other towns in South East England, partly in protestant solidarity, and partly as an economic measure, to poach their lucrative skills and trades, particularly in the production of fine cloth and linens.  It was a brain drain event.  Eastern English towns and cities had been economically waning ever since the 14th century, and cloth production was in decline.

Most of the Norwich Strangers were Dutch-speaking Flemish, but a minority of the Strangers were French-speaking.  They were known as the Walloons.  In 1637, they opened their own French-speaking protestant church in Norwich, in a disused medieval church, St Mary-the-lesser.  The Walloons were known for their dry, colourful clothes, that in Norwich, developed into a style known as Norwich Stuffs.  I cannot yet say, that my 8th great grandfather John Rosier, was without doubt, the son of the Norwich based Walloon, Jean Rosiere, but it looks highly likely.  The surname Rosiere has elsewhere been associated with British Huguenot families - a slightly later emigration event.  That John Rosier appeared to move around Norfolk somewhat, suggests that he had a trade other than the usual farming.  Jean Rosiere of Norwich had a son baptised at the French Protestant Church in 1667, also named Jean Rosier - just the right age for my 8th great grandfather.  I can find no other references to any other Jean Rosiere nor John Rosier in Norfolk at that time.

This is only the second non-English born ancestor that I have so far traced, out of some 420 direct ancestors.  I feel enormously proud to have found a link back to the Norwich Strangers.

The Rosiere Family appear to have been a French Protestant (Walloon) family living in 17th Century Norwich.  I can see references to a Jean Rosiere, and a Philipe Rosiere.  Both appear to have had children in the City, that appear to have married into English families.  There is a later reference to a Rosiere in Norwich, listed as a wool comber, so indeed, they appear to have been involved in the cloth and linen trade.  My reference to the baptism of Jean Rosier in 1667, is unfortunately only a transcription, but it does state Walloon.  An earlier baptism in 1662 of Ollende (Holland) Rosieres to Jean Rosieres is however available online, and comes from the registers of the French Protestant Church in Norwich.  This looks like an older sister of John Rosier.

The next record for my 8th great grandfather, John Rosier, appears over in Swaffham, Norfolk in 1696.  It was his marriage to Elizabeth Fen:

Both John and Elizabeth were recorded as widow and widower.  I have not yest found their earlier marriages.

He moves again.  Their daughter, Rachel Rosier, is baptised at Watton, Norfolk, in 1709:

That is currently my last record for John and Elizabeth.  But Rachel is my 7th great grandmother.  She appears to move to East Dereham, Norfolk - the last move for this line for several generations.  But for some reason, she marries Allen Bradfield of Swanton Morley (just outside of Dereham) several miles away at Necton, Norfolk:

They have a daughter named Elizabeth Bradfield, born 1745 at Dereham:

Elizabeth Bradfield, goes on to marry Solomon Harris at nearby Swanton Morley in 1767:

For some reason, her parish is recorded as Holme Hale.  The family appear to have some sort of connection to the Necton area.  Perhaps inherited property?

They have a daughter named Elizabeth Harris, at Swanton Morley, in 1768:

In 1800, Elizabeth Harris gives birth to an illegitimate daughter, my 4th great grandmother, Jemima Harris:

In 1825, this daughter, Jemima Harris, married my 4th great grandfather, James Alderton Barber at Swanton Morley.  They lived there, and Jemima had no less than eight children.  James was a farm labourer.  Their oldest child was my 3rd great grandmother, Harriet Barber.

Harriet Barber gave birth to an illegimate daughter that she also named Harriet Barber, at the nearby workhouse at Gressenhall in 1846.  I have a copy of her birth certificate.  Harriet the younger, was my 2nd great grandmother.  The family line appears to have fallen on hard times.  In later years, a William Barker was named as her errant father.

My 2nd great grandmother Harriet, ended up back in Gressenhall Union Workhouse as a young mother herself.  She gave birth to two illegitimate daughters herself, before marrying their father, William Bennett Baxter, whio had also been born illegitimately in that same workhouse himself.

The couple settled at Swanton Morley, after living for a little while at Denton, Norfolk (perhaps chasing work).  They had a total of at least eight children.  The youngest, was my great grandmother, Faith Eliza Baxter, born 1885 at East Dereham:

Faith was the mother of my grandfather, Reginald Brooker.  There is my claim of descent from one the Norwich Strangers.

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